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2015 Report Card

Please select a section of the 2015 Report Card:

Health & Nutrition

2015 Accomplishments

  1. The Department of Health has been working hard to ensure that as many eligible WIC applicants are able to take advantage of critical services. Currently, WIC has 56,000 participants, serving 54% of all babies born in New Mexico, down from 63% in FY2014. WIC is performing outreach to health care providers to encourage more potentially pregnant women to enroll in the WIC during their 1st and 2nd trimesters. This would increase healthy pregnancy outcomes for mothers and infants.

  2. In 2015, the New Mexico Breastfeeding Taskforce (NMBFTF) hired four Breastfeeding Workplace Liaisons in Albuquerque and Las Cruces. They provide breastfeeding technical assistance to employers and advocate for lactating working mothers, and will help identify new ways to support businesses in better accommodating workplace breastfeeding. We are so pleased that through continued efforts, breastfeeding initiation in New Mexico has increased to 79.7% of the 16,451 WIC infants born during FY14. This is an increase over the 75.1% of WIC infants born during FY13. WIC also secured USDA funding to collaborate with the NM Breastfeeding Task Force (BFTF) to increase public awareness of New Mexico’s breastfeeding in the worksite law through production of 3 TV commercials. The DOH WIC TV commercials began airing in September 2015 and continue airing through the spring of 2016.

  3. Healthy Kids Healthy Communities (HKHC) and over 400 state and local partners have worked together to expand halthy eating and physical activity opportunities for a quarter of New Mexico’s elementary school-age children. Of those students, four out of five have regular access to fruit and vegetable snacks, classroom tastings, and/or salads offered during meal time. Another three out of five have increased physical activity opportunities before, during, and after school, including walk and roll to school programs and safe, active schoolyards. On September 24, 2015, Governor Susana Martinez announced an expansion of Healthy Kids Healthy Communities due to an additional $1 million federal grant. HKHC will expand its reach from 9 to 18 counties and 2 to 6 tribal communities in FY16, effectively reaching half of New Mexico’s elementary school-age children through obesity prevention efforts focused on nutrition and physical activity. Obesity prevalence among third grade students continues to decrease (from 22.6% in 2010 to 18.1% in 2014), corresponding to a 19.9% change over five years. For the first year, kindergarten obesity prevalence is lower than it was in 2010 (11.6% compared to 13.2% in 2010), corresponding to a 12.1% change over five years. Similar downward trends occur when both kindergarten and third grade obesity and overweight prevalence are combined. (Link to NM Childhood Obesity 2014 Update: http://nmhealth.org/data/view/chronic/1585/)

  4. CYFD continues to make nutrition a priority for New Mexico’s families through its Family Nutrition Bureau and its partnership with Healthy Kids New Mexico. Under the umbrella of the Family Nutrition Bureau, CYFD administers a federally-funded program called Child and Adult Care Food Program, which reimburses approved non-profits for the healthy meals they provide to eligible kids and adults. Healthy Kids New Mexico works with licensed childcare centers to support the healthy eating and physical activity components of the programs about 42,000 preschool children attend. New Mexico is #2 only to Washington D.C. for the disbursement of summer food programs. We are proud to serve over 1.5 million meals per month in homes and centers around New Mexico.

Programs & Services

Child and Adult Care/Summer Food Program- CYFD

Through agreements with community-based non-profit organizations and eligible for-profit organizations, the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) provides reimbursement to childcare providers for nutritious meals and snacks served to primarily low-income children in child care settings. Adult Day Care centers that are licensed and provide care to adults in non-residential settings are also reimbursed through this program. The program is administered by the Family Nutrition Bureau (FNB) and is 100% federally-funded.

The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), provides nutritious meals to children during the summer when school is not in session. FNB enters into agreements with local nonprofit sponsoring agencies, local government agencies, faith-based organizations, summer camps, school food authorities and other eligible institutions to administer the SFSP at the local level.

Budget Implications:The Family Nutrition Bureau which houses the Child and Adult Care and Summer Food Program. It is funded solely with federal dollars.

Healthy Kids New Mexico (HKNM)

Healthy Kids New Mexico (HKNM), a project of the New Mexico Department of Health, builds state and local partnerships to expand children’s opportunities for healthy eating and active living where they live, learn and play.

Budget Implications: Fiscal Year 2014: Federal - $2,090,857

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Behavioral Health Services

Community Outreach and Behavioral Health provides the following: Oversight of community-based behavioral health services, community-based service development ,support to JJS, PS, and ECS Licensing and Certification Authority (LCA) activities, supportive housing, community volunteerism programs, Medicaid eligibility assistance.

Budget Implications: CYFD Behavioral Health Services are provided utilizing state General Fund and federal grant dollars.

Maternal & Child Health (DOH)

Maternal & Child Health (MCH) serves mothers and children ages pre-birth to age eight. Prenatal care is provided through the licensing and regulation of midwifery care in NM. MCH regulates both Licensed Midwives (home births) and Certified Nurse Midwives. About 30% of all births in New Mexico were attended by midwives, and untold hours of prenatal and postpartum care were provided by these midwives.

For the next three years, MCH/Child Health will focus on expanding developmental screening activities for children, ages birth-three years, in early care and education and linking training and increasing appropriate referrals when needed among medical homes, early intervention services, child care programs, and families. Using Results Based Accountability and the Collective Impact approach, the State Team will work on a common agenda to expand developmental screening activities. Contributions from multiple sectors will be aligned toward specific measureable results.

Budget Implications: The MCH budget ($2,084,674) is 80% Federal funds and 20% state general funds. 15,164 children were served.

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Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (DOH)

Children’s Medical Services (CMS) program provides services for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disabling conditions in children. It is a statewide program within the Department of Health, Public Health Division. CMS serves children from birth to 21 with chronic illnesses or medical conditions that require surgical or medical treatment. CMS offers medical coverage, information and referral, and care coordination. CMS social workers assist clients to coordinate health, medical and other community resources as they develop and meet child and family goals. Families participate as partners in decision-making regarding their children’s medical care and other services. Services are coordinated in partnership with the local primary care provider / medical home. Talking with a CMS social worker can help families communicate well with the child’s primary care physician and obtain the medical and educational services that their child needs. CMS sponsors community-based asthma, cleft palate, neurology, metabolic, nephrology, genetic and endocrinology clinics throughout the state in collaboration with the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center and Presbyterian Hospital to improve access to pediatric specialty care. CMS collaborates with community partners throughout the State to improve the health care infrastructure for children and youth with special health care needs including access to a medical home, community based culturally competent health care and adequate health care financing.

Budget Implications: The CMS budget ($6,967,641,000) is 57% Federal funds and 43% state general funds.

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New Mexico Women, Infant, and Children Program (WIC) (DOH)

The major focus of the New Mexico WIC Program is to safeguard the health of nutritionally at-risk low-income pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women, infant, children and seniors by providing nutritious foods to supplement diets, nutrition information for healthy eating, health counseling, breastfeeding support, nutrition classes, cooking classes, and referrals to health care providers and social services. WIC offers new foods like fresh, frozen and canned fruits and vegetables, whole grain cereal, bread, corn and whole wheat tortillas, brown rice, oatmeal, soy milk, tofu, canned beans, and baby food. WIC also provides, milk, eggs, cheese, beans, peanut butter, carrots, tuna, juices, cereal, infant formula and baby cereal. WIC is a Federal grant program for which Congress authorizes a specific amount of funding each year for program operations.

Budget Implications: $57,706,000.00 FFY 13 Budget , 43,815,000.00 Federal and $891,000.00 State, $13,000,000.00 Rebate-Food Funds

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Student Nutrition (PED)

The Student Nutrition Bureau administers National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs which are federally assisted meal programs operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. Other federal programs administered by the Student Nutrition Bureau include Breakfast After the Bell, Seamless Summer, Special Milk, Fresh Fruit and Vegetable, and Locally Grown Fresh Fruit and Vegetable programs.

Budget Implications: The program used $123 million in federal funds and $1.9 million in state funds to serve nearly 237,000 students in FY13

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Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (DOH)

Children’s Medical Services (CMS) program provides services for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disabling conditions in children. It is a statewide program within the Department of Health, Public Health Division. CMS serves children from birth to 21 with chronic illnesses or medical conditions that require surgical or medical treatment. CMS offers medical coverage, information and referral, and care coordination. CMS social workers assist clients to coordinate health, medical and other community resources as they develop and meet child and family goals. Families participate as partners in decision-making regarding their children’s medical care and other services. Services are coordinated in partnership with the local primary care provider / medical home. Talking with a CMS social worker can help families communicate well with the child’s primary care physician and obtain the medical and educational services that their child needs. CMS sponsors community-based asthma, cleft palate, neurology, metabolic, nephrology, genetic and endocrinology clinics throughout the state in collaboration with the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center and Presbyterian Hospital to improve access to pediatric specialty care. CMS collaborates with community partners throughout the State to improve the health care infrastructure for children and youth with special health care needs including access to a medical home, community based culturally competent health care and adequate health care financing.

Budget Implications: $6,967,641.00

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Legislative Achievements

SB121 VACCINE PURCHASING ACT

This legislation establishes a statewide vaccine purchasing program, creates the vaccine purchasing fund, requires reporting of the number of insured children, authorizes assessments to be levied on health insurers for costs of vaccines for insured children, and specifies penalties for failure to report the number of insured children.

SB433 INCLUDE E-CIGARETTES IN TOBACCO PRODUCTS ACT

Senate Bill 433 amends the Tobacco Products Act title to include e-cigarettes, so that it now reads, “Tobacco Products, E-Cigarette and Nicotine Liquid Container Act.” The bill prohibits the sale of e-cigarette and nicotine liquid containers to minors and requires nicotine liquid containers to be sold in child-resistant packaging. Additionally, the legislation prohibits the online Internet sale of e-cigarette and nicotine liquid containers to minors in New Mexico. Senate Bill 433 provides for penalties for violations of this act. As in current law for tobacco products, anyone who sells to a minor is guilty of a misdemeanor, and anyone who is a minor and purchases the product will be fined $100 or be required to complete 48 hours of community service.

SB189 GOOD SAMARITAN LIABILITY

This legislation introduces a new standard under the Cardiac Arrest Response Act, by which civil liability can be imposed on a “good Samaritan.” These are individuals who provide emergency automated external defibrillator (AED) services to a person who is in need of defibrillation and will allow citizens to jump to action without fear of liability in these emergencies.

HM9 IMPROVING THE SYSTEM OF HEALTH CARE TRANSITION FOR NEW MEXICO CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH SPECIAL HEALTH CARE NEEDS

The Health Care Transition Task force was convened by the DOH Children’s Medical Services program and the Center for Development and Disability to address the needs of children and youth with special health care needs and/or disabilities who are in the difficult process of moving from pediatric to adult medical care. The task force met from January through August 2015 and developed several recommendations for system improvement.

HB53 NO COMPELLED MEDICATION USE FOR STUDENTS

House Bill 53 enacts a new section of the Public School Code to prohibit school personnel from compelling students to use psychotropic medications. These are medications that are used to treat psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders (like OCD), and attention deficit disorder. The legislation indicates that while school personnel may share classroom observations and recommendations with a parent, they shall not require the student to undergo psychological screenings unless the parent or guardian gives written consent. Additionally, the bill states that an employee or agent of the school shall not compel or attempt to compel any specific actions by the parent or guardian that require a student to take psychotropic medication.

HB54 ANESTHESIOLOGY DEFINITIONS & REQUIREMENTS

HB54 amends the definitions of anesthesiologist and anesthesiologist assistants in the Anesthesiologist Assistant Act, removing the provision that requires an anesthesiologist to be employed by a department of anesthesiology in a medical school in New Mexico, and allows an anesthesiologist assistant to practice only if they are employed by the University of New Mexico. By amending these existing definitions, anesthesiologists and anesthesiologist assistants will be able to practice in other hospitals in New Mexico as well as health facilities licensed by the Department of Health in one of the Class A counties, where a minimum of three board-certified anesthesiologists are on staff. This bill does not expand the scope of practice, so these practitioners would only be able to perform exactly the same functions as they are already permitted in this section of law.

HB212 CRISIS TRIAGE SERVICE REIMBURSEMENT RATE

House Bill 212 requires that both the Department of Health (DOH) and the Human Services Department (HSD) promulgate rules in order to allow crisis triage centers (CTCs) to be licensed by the DOH. HSD and DOH must also establish Medicaid reimbursement rates. These steps are critical as they are required by the federal government in order for the services at CTCs to be reimbursable through the Medicaid program. Under federal Medicaid rules, Medicaid will only make payments to a licensed CTC; if there are no provisions under state law for the CTC to be licensed by the state, Medicaid reimbursement would not be allowed. Ultimately, this legislation will assist patients in accessing quality behavioral health services and receiving reimbursement for qualifying services.

HB121 USE OF NURSE EDUCATORS FUND

This bill adds practicing registered nurses, who are not currently educators, to the list of professionals who are eligible to receive financial aid from HED. This may ultimately increase the number of nursing instructors at postsecondary institutions, as well as the number of nurses with advanced degrees in their field. (Note: SB 341 is identical.)

Proposed Next Steps

Step 1:
Healthy Kids Healthy Communities
  • Continue to expand the Healthy Kids Healthy Communities model to 18 counties and 6 tribal communities to implement policy, systems, and environmental strategies in a multi-sector community coalition-driven approach.
  • Have Cooperative Extension Service nutrition educators in every HKHC community to integrate nutrition education efforts that are in alignment with HKHC policy, systems, and environmental strategies.
  • Strengthen and expand state and local partnerships to maximize collective impact of obesity prevention efforts.
Step 2:
The Human Services Department (HSD) and the Indian Affairs Department (IAD) will work together to implement the PAXIS Good Behavior Game (GBG) in certain public and Indian schools throughout the state. The GBG makes class time a game, where teams of students get fun, silly rewards—like jumping around or tapping their pencils for 30 seconds—if they have fewer than three undesirable behaviors, called “spleems,” during a set time. As a result, the GBG teaches self-regulation to make “behaving” fun for students, and classroom management easier for teachers. PAXIS research suggests that the GBG may have long-term benefits for students who play it, including stronger academic performance and lower probability of drug use or crime.
Step 3:
CYFD continues to collaborate with various agencies to strengthen multi-disciplinary teams to improve the outcomes for children and families, especially with a 2016 launch of its new PullTogether campaign to make our state the best place to be a kid.

Partnerships & Other Information

New Mexico Interagency Council for the Prevention of Obesity

The New Mexico Interagency Council for the Prevention of Obesity brings together a diverse group of partners to create collaborative state and local policy, making environmental and programmatic changes for healthy eating, active living, chronic disease and obesity prevention and health equity. The NM Interagency Council for the Prevention of Obesity is charged to:

  1. Build greater alignment across state programs to create sustainable, consistent, and collaborative efforts and messages to increase physical activity, healthy eating and prevent obesity;

  2. Build and support community-wide obesity prevention efforts;

  3. Coordinate and support obesity prevention policy recommendations and initiatives across state agencies;

  4. Collect routine data from Interagency Council members for surveillance and monitoring of progress toward creating environmental, policy and behavioral changes to increase physical activity, healthy eating and healthy weights; and

  5. Establish and maintain an information sharing and communication network. Membership includes: 7 Departments, 35 state programs, and 3 affiliate organizations. Interagency Council members represent the state Departments of:

    1. Health;
    2. Education;
    3. Human Services;
    4. Children, Youth Families;
    5. Aging and Long Term Services;
    6. Agriculture; and
    7. Transportation

  6. Affiliate, non-voting organizations are: New Mexico Healthier Weight Council, NM Cooperative Extension Services, NM Food and Agriculture Policy Council.

Healthy Kids Healthy Communities

Healthy Kids Healthy Communities (HKHC) partners with 9 counties and 4 tribal communities including: Chaves, Cibola, Curry, Dona Ana, Guadalupe, Lea, Luna, McKinley, Rio Arriba (northern), Socorro and Mescalero Apache, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara and Zuni. HKHC is a coalition-led community initiative focused on environmental and systems change to increase healthy eating and physical activity opportunities where children live, learn and play.

Strategies include:

  1. Opening outdoor school space for community use during non-school hours;

  2. Increasing the number of safe walking and biking routes that connect neighborhoods to schools;

  3. Increasing healthy eating and physical activity opportunities in school via classroom fruit and vegetable tastings and fit breaks;

  4. Increasing access to and availability of affordable, healthy, and locally grown foods in schools and the community via farmers’ markets, school and community gardens, and healthy corner stores;

  5. Establishing the New Mexico Centennial 5.2.1.O Challenge in elementary schools statewide; and

  6. Supporting childcare providers in making healthy eating and physical activity a part of their daily routines.
© 2014 New Mexico Children's Cabinet